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What Is Cybersecurity Management?

Cybersecurity Management Definition

Cybersecurity management refers to an organization's strategic efforts to safeguard information resources. It focuses on the ways businesses leverage their security assets, including software and IT security solutions, to safeguard business systems. 

These resources are increasingly vulnerable to internal and external security threats such as industrial espionage, theft, fraud, and sabotage. Cybersecurity management must employ a variety of administrative, legal, technological, procedural, and employee practices to reduce organizations’ risk exposure.

Importance of Risk Management in Cybersecurity

Cybersecurity is crucial to operational processes because it guards against the theft and destruction of data and IT systems, including personally identifiable information (PII), protected health information (PHI), personal data, data pertaining to intellectual property, and information systems. 

Your company cannot protect itself from data breaches without a cybersecurity strategy. In the absence of effective cybersecurity management practices, your organization becomes a prime target for cyber criminals.

Framework of Cybersecurity Management

While a commonly accepted framework for cybersecurity has not been established, there are some guiding principles, precautions, and technologies that many organizations have chosen to adopt, including:

These serve as the de facto frameworks for cybersecurity management, and they outline techniques and standards for protecting digital assets.

Cybersecurity Management Frameword

Cybersecurity Management Benefits

An effective cybersecurity management policy takes into account the risks that exist for an organization's resources. Those that administer the program formalize processes and procedures. Once vulnerabilities are found, the management policy will outline solutions to stop malicious code from infiltrating the organization's perimeter defense systems, servers, and desktops. It also describes how to deploy mitigation measures and who is in charge in the event of a breach.

A cybersecurity management program provides an organization with critical services, such as:

  1. Designing and implementing an efficient enterprise security architecture
  2. Mitigating advanced threats
  3. Securing Internet-of-Things (IoT) devices
  4. Identity and access management (IAM)
  5. Providing security intelligence

Some external cybersecurity management services also provide IT security consulting to help companies craft the best strategies to protect their environments now and in the future.

Difference Between Cybersecurity and Cybersecurity Management

What is cybersecurity management? A cybersecurity management system is different from cybersecurity itself. Cybersecurity management focuses on ways to organize security assets, people, and processes, while cybersecurity is a general label for protecting an organization’s digital infrastructure. 

In this cybersecurity management definition, the act of managing cybersecurity involves both technical strategy and shaping company culture.

6 Best Practices in Cybersecurity Management

Here are six tried-and-tested best practices for cybersecurity management.

1. Understand Your IT Assets and Environment

Effective cybersecurity management requires in-depth knowledge of the IT environments and resources within your firm, including all data and other digital assets, BYOD devices, systems, networks, third-party services, technologies, endpoints, and other relevant items. 

Awareness of all the elements of your IT landscape is critical, especially because each facet of your network can be used to penetrate your system. Also, it is imperative that you assess your assets and monitor your IT environment continuously.

2. Deploy a Risk Management Strategy

Managing risk without a well-thought-out and effective cybersecurity risk management strategy is counterproductive. Organizations must create sound strategies and plans to keep them up-to-date. 

Prior to planning, determine your level of risk tolerance and then create a risk profile. Include roles for all employees and key stakeholders, incident response and escalation strategies, and other relevant information.

3. Make Cybersecurity Risk Management an Element of Company Culture

Even well-crafted cybersecurity risk management policies and processes are useless if they are not properly implemented throughout the firm. So make sure to convey your ideas, plans, and procedures to all parties involved. Integrate cybersecurity risk management within the values and culture of the company. Each party involved in managing cyber threats needs to be aware of, understand, and embrace their responsibilities.

4. Use Continuous, Adaptive, and Actionable Risk Assessments

Risk identification and assessment are two of the most crucial components of risk management. Risks associated with cybersecurity are always changing. A change in company procedures or the introduction of new technologies, for example, can change your risks significantly. As a result, the organization's general risk assessment has to be adjusted. To ensure effective security, your procedures must be continuously assessed for deficiencies—and improved.

Risk assessments are also critical because they provide the business with information about where vulnerabilities currently exist, as well as which threats are on the horizon.

5. Implement Strict Security Protocols

Effective risk mitigation requires a security system that is both comprehensive and user-friendly. Here are a few techniques:

  1. Use a web application firewall (WAF) managed and situated at the network's edge to keep track of traffic, offer immediate and actionable information, and continuously protect against known and unknown threats.
  2. Extend security to BYOD devices and all other hardware in your IT environment.
  3. Implement stringent security procedures for remote employees.
  4. When possible, use automatic patching to keep all security systems up-to-date.
  5. Implement stringent access controls and authentication policies.
  6. Consolidate systems and data whenever possible. Data that is segregated and dispersed is more difficult to manage and secure.
  7. Set up a consistent, reliable backup system.

6. Enhance Visibility into Your Network

Visibility into all areas of your network is critical to preventing and mitigating cybersecurity incidents. Factors like insider threats, third-party components with built-in vulnerabilities, and human error can endanger your environment. Real-time and trustworthy visibility into your organization's risk profile is essential.

Cybersecurity Risk Management Trends

Here are some of the current trends impacting cybersecurity risk management.

Risks in the Digital Supply Chain

Attacks on the digital supply chain can yield a significant return on investment, as cyber criminals have come to realize. More dangers are anticipated as new vulnerabilities proliferate throughout the supply chain. This is primarily because third parties, which have varying levels of cybersecurity, have become a primary attack vector for bad actors. 

For example, even though your environment is relatively secure, a criminal may use a provider in your supply chain with access to your system as a conduit to infiltrate your network.

Expanding Attack Surface

Attack surfaces on enterprise systems are growing. Risks related to IoT, open-source software, cloud computing, complicated digital supply chains, social media, and other technologies are leaving many organizations exposed to attackers. To handle a wider range of security exposures, companies must look beyond conventional security monitoring, detection, and response methodologies.

This may involve developing internal and external business systems, as well as automating security gap identification. Chief information security officers (CISOs) can use external attack surface management (EASM) technologies, digital risk protection services (DRPS), and cyber asset attack surface management (CAASM) to implement these kinds of systems.

Wider Distribution of Cybersecurity Responsibilities

Executives now want more adaptive security as enterprise cybersecurity demands and expectations mature. To do this, it is best to spread cybersecurity decision-making, accountability, and responsibility throughout the organization, rather than keeping them centralized. 

This is particularly important because of the increasing size and complexity of organizations, which may make it difficult for a single person or small team to handle cybersecurity management on their own.

How Fortinet Can Help?

Timely, global threat intelligence paired with quick decisions and responses are essential for best-in-class security. Through FortiGuard Labs and FortiManager, Fortinet provides some of the best and most robust artificial intelligence-driven security currently on the market.

With Fortinet, you benefit from:

  1. Application control: Fortinet has one of the largest application databases for protecting your business from dangerous apps and giving you visibility and control over the applications running on your network.
  2. Intrusion prevention: Block unauthorized access attempts that aim to exploit configuration flaws and vulnerabilities in your network.
  3. Advanced threats: FortiGuard has industry-leading advanced malware, antivirus, and sandboxing capabilities, stopping dangerous files and payloads from entering your network.

FAQs

What is cybersecurity mangement?

Cybersecurity management refers to an organization's strategic efforts to safeguard information resources. It focuses on the ways businesses leverage their security assets, including software and IT security solutions, to safeguard business systems.

What are the benefits of cybersecurity management?

An effective cybersecurity management policy takes into account the risks that exist for an organization's resources. Those that administer the program formalize processes and procedures. Once vulnerabilities are found, the management policy will outline solutions to stop malicious code from infiltrating the organization's perimeter defense systems, servers, and desktops.